Bald-eagle showing just how tough they are when incubating their eggs covered in snow.

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Photographs captured from the Pennsylvania Game Commission’s eagle camera at Codorus State Park on March 5.

HANOVER, Pennsylvania – Think you’ve had it up to your neck with snow? Try being one of the bald eagles at Codorus State Park.

The eagles took dedication and parenting to a whole new level Thursday as several inches of snow covered their nest near Lake Marburg.

As the snow piled higher, one of the eagles remained on the nest and the pair’s two eggs – even when everything was covered but the bird’s head.

The Pennsylvania Game Commission, which placed a camera at the nest and has a live stream on its website, assures us that the eagles and their eggs will be just fine. Bald eagles nest as far north as Maine, Alaska and Canada and begin nesting as early as January.

Hang in there, eagles. Those eggs should hatch in two or three weeks.

The Game Commission’s eagle live stream can be found at www.pgc.state.pa.us.

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 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-4DK0sCiMd8

Documentary – Celebrating 30 Years of Restoration

The bald eagle’s history in Pennsylvania is a precarious one. Only 30 years ago, we had a mere three nests left in our entire state. With the help of the Canadian government, several agencies including the Pennsylvania Game Commission brought bald eagle chicks back to their states to reintroduce bald eagles to the Northeast. Today, Pennsylvania boasts more than 250 nests. This 22-minute documentary is the story of that success.

 

Tawny Owl in Cumbria found by John Miles incubating eggs completely covered by snow, read what John had to say.

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Years ago I checked a Tawny owl nest in April and discovered her sitting under snow. I had to dig her out and her as her eggs were just hatching. That is why she stayed put and did not leave her eggs allowing me to move all the snow on top of her. I left the nest and she still reared 2 chicks. Amazing! [Picture off an old slide ]
John Miles’s photo.

 

1 comment to Bald-eagle showing just how tough they are when incubating their eggs covered in snow.

  • John Miles

    Years ago I checked a Tawny owl in April and discovered her sitting under snow. I had to dig her out and her eggs were just hatching. That is why she stayed put. I left the nest and she still reared 2 chicks. Amazing! [Picture off an old slide ]
    John Miles’s photo.