Scottish Raptor Monitoring Coordinator- Job Vacancy

  • Organisation: British Trust for Ornithology
    Salary: £21,452 – £23,835 pa + pension
    Reference: EJ/14-7
    Location: Stirling
    Hours: Full Time
    Position type: Paid
    Contract: Fixed Term Contract
    Closing date: Tue 18 March 14
    Website: www.bto.org
    Contact name: Rebecca Cranston
    Contact telephone: 01786 466560
    Contact email: scot.info@bto.org

SCOTTISH RAPTOR MONITORING COORDINATOR

POST HOSTED BY BTO SCOTLAND, STIRLING, ON BEHALF OF THE SCOTTISH RAPTORMONITORING SCHEME

Background

The Scottish Raptor Monitoring Scheme (SRMS) is a partnership comprising seven organisations (SNH, the Scottish Raptor Study Groups, JNCC, BTO Scotland, RSPB Scotland, the Scottish Ornithologists’ Club and the Rare Breeding Birds Panel), and with the recent addition of Forestry Commission Scotland. Since its inception in 2002, the SRMS has developed very positively in terms of: the raptor monitoring coverage in Scotland (largely carried out by members of the Scottish Raptor Study Groups); the numbers of records submitted to the Scheme annually; and the utility of the dataset for producing information on breeding raptor numbers, their productivity and trends through time. The success of the SRMS was formally recognised by IEEM with a Best Practice Award in 2010.

The SRMS makes important contributions to a range of essential areas of biodiversity conservation, including:

  • EU Birds Directive Article 12 and Habitats Directive Article 17 reporting;
  • the new Scottish Biodiversity Surveillance Strategy;
  • the production of species trends and indicators; reporting on the status of populations on designated sites (SSSIs and SPAs) and nationally via contributions to SCARABBS surveys;
  •  informing wind farm and other development-related casework, and cumulative impact assessment, including via regional population estimates and emerging trends; and
  • tackling wildlife crime by providing objective evidence of deliberate human interference.

The SRMS has previously been supported by a part-time Raptor Monitoring Officer, Brian Etheridge, who was responsible for the day-to-day running of Scheme activities. Following Brian’s retirement from the post, the SRMS now seeks a dynamic, self-motivated person with raptor ecology/survey and monitoring experience to co-ordinate the SRMS on a full-time basis. He/she will be supported by the Head of BTO Scotland (Dr Chris Wernham), other colleagues at the BTO in Stirling, and the Chair and representatives of partner organisations on the Scottish Raptor Monitoring Group (SRMG).

The work will involve liaising with and supporting the network of volunteers (300+) that contribute to the Scheme, maintaining the SRMS database, managing the data and reporting on an annual basis, encouraging more volunteers to get involved in raptor monitoring in Scotland (including via a new entry-level recording scheme), providing training to volunteers, and promotion of the Scheme and its outputs to users of the information. The ideal candidate will have experience of field research on birds of prey and of survey and monitoring, and a passion for motivating volunteers to participate fully in SRMS activities. He/she must be an excellent communicator, who will enjoy presenting the SRMS to a range of audiences (volunteers, scientists, policy-makers, the media), and must be competent and meticulous in data management and Scheme administration.

Further details and the application form are available from our website by clicking ‘more information’ below, or from Rebecca Cranston (tel: 01786 466560; email: scot.info@bto.org) Please quote reference EJ/14-7.

Charity No. 216652 (E&W); SC039193 (Scotland)

2 comments to Scottish Raptor Monitoring Coordinator- Job Vacancy

  • paul williams

    Allegedly, sinister advice on Bio-diversity.

  • paul williams

    LAWFUL REBELLION
    ‘Prof Andy Aplin, a former adviser to oil giant BP and now at Durham University, said that exploiting the Bowland shale, based on the example of the US, might require 33,000 wells.’